Skin Cancer and Early Detection

detection deviceTwo technologies — MelaFind and dermatoscopy — use light waves and sophisticated data analysis to diagnose suspicious lesions. In a 2011 study, MelaFind was able to detect 98 percent of melanomas, compared with 78 percent by a dermatologist’s examination alone. Because melanoma can be difficult to diagnose in its earliest stages, when it’s most treatable, this is good news indeed.

On the treatment front, doctors are increasingly aggressive in attacking precancerous lesions with cryotherapy, phototherapy and topical chemotherapies such as trichloroacetic acid, 5-fluorouracil and ingenol mebutate.

Once a skin cancer is diagnosed, the first step is usually to surgically remove it. If that’s not possible, the Food and Drug Administration has approved, in addition to topical chemotherapies, several medications — among them, imiquimod and ipilimumab — that treat skin cancers by activating the body’s immune system.

The best treatment, of course, is to prevent skin damage in the first place. Be sure to wear sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 daily. And if you notice any of the American Cancer Society’s warning signs, at right, see your doctor right away.

A wonderful resource for guidance and photos is the American Cancer Society website. And don’t forget about your smartphone. There are multiple apps that can give you insight about whether you are dealing with something serious or benign. Even something as simple as texting or emailing your doctor a photo of the suspicious lesion can save you time and worry and get your doctor in the loop as soon as possible.

Posted in General Health.